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2010 Mercury Milan, Ford Fusion Set New Standard for Hybrids

Posted on April 21, 2009
Filed Under Ford Fusion, Future Speculation, Mercury Milan | Leave a Comment

2010_ford_fusion_mediumI hadn’t even cast my vote for 2009 North American Car of the Year when the first contender for the 2010 award arrived at my doorstep on a snowy day just before Christmas.

The 2010 I hadn’t even cast my vote for 2009 North American Car of the Year when the first contender for the 2010 award arrived at my doorstep on a snowy day just before Christmas.

The 2010 Mercury Milan and Ford Fusion hybrid midsize sedans are the first of a new generation of hybrids that will hit the road this year. They set the bar high for other eagerly awaited hybrids like the new Toyota Prius and Honda Insight that are to debut at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit next week.

Why then, are the 2010 Milan and Fusion hybrids such a big deal?

Because, for the moment at least, they vault Ford Motor Co. to the forefront of hybrid technology, easily topping the fuel economy of competitive midsize hybrid versions of the Toyota Camry and Chevy Malibu.

The Fusion and Milan hybrids are to go on sale this spring. Ford hasn’t announced prices, but I’ve got enough information to make a good estimate. Expect the Milan hybrid to start around $27,500. Expect a base Fusion hybrid to cost a couple of hundred dollars less than the Milan.

The Milan hybrid I tested had every conceivable option, from a power sunroof to a voice-controlled navigation system, blind-spot detection and a 12-speaker Sony stereo system. It will probably cost around $33,000.

Those prices compare favorably with the Toyota Camry hybrid, the car most similar to the Fusion and Milan hybrids. A base Camry hybrid stickers at $26,150. A fully optioned one goes for $32,858, but does not offer some features on the Milan I tested, including Sync for voice control of mobile phones, iPods and other audio devices.

Other competitors include the Nissan Altima hybrid, which uses the same system as the Camry, and the Chevrolet Malibu and Saturn Aura hybrids, which have less-powerful hybrid systems.

The Milan and Fusion hybrids generate 191 total horsepower from a 156-horsepower 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and electric motor. That power is translated to the front wheels through a smooth and effective continuously variable transmission.

and Ford Fusion hybrid midsize sedans are the first of a new generation of hybrids that will hit the road this year. They set the bar high for other eagerly awaited hybrids like the new Toyota Prius and Honda Insight that are to debut at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit next week.

Why then, are the 2010 Milan and Fusion hybrids such a big deal?

Because, for the moment at least, they vault Ford Motor Co. to the forefront of hybrid technology, easily topping the fuel economy of competitive midsize hybrid versions of the Toyota Camry and Chevy Malibu.

The Fusion and Milan hybrids are to go on sale this spring. Ford hasn’t announced prices, but I’ve got enough information to make a good estimate. Expect the Milan hybrid to start around $27,500. Expect a base Fusion hybrid to cost a couple of hundred dollars less than the Milan.

The Milan hybrid I tested had every conceivable option, from a power sunroof to a voice-controlled navigation system, blind-spot detection and a 12-speaker Sony stereo system. It will probably cost around $33,000.

Those prices compare favorably with the Toyota Camry hybrid, the car most similar to the Fusion and Milan hybrids. A base Camry hybrid stickers at $26,150. A fully optioned one goes for $32,858, but does not offer some features on the Milan I tested, including Sync for voice control of mobile phones, iPods and other audio devices.

Other competitors include the Nissan Altima hybrid, which uses the same system as the Camry, and the Chevrolet Malibu and Saturn Aura hybrids, which have less-powerful hybrid systems.

The Milan and Fusion hybrids generate 191 total horsepower from a 156-horsepower 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and electric motor. That power is translated to the front wheels through a smooth and effective continuously variable transmission.

SOURCE: Detroit Free Press

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